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Clinical performance of CEREC ceramic inlays: a systematic review
by Martin N, Jedynakiewicz NM; Dent Mater. 1999; 15(1): 54 - 61.


OBJECTIVE:
This systematic review of clinical trials seeks to identify the clinical performance of intra-coronal CEREC restorations luted with an adhesive composite technique. The focus of the review is to establish the survival rate of these restorations and to identify the factors that may cause them to fail.

METHOD:
A comprehensive literature search was undertaken, spanning from the year of introduction of the technology- 1986 to 1997. This review identifies universal indicators of the clinical performance of intra-coronal CEREC restorations luted with an adhesive composite technique. Throughout the critical appraisal, each individual study was analyzed identifying the aims, the methodology and materials used and the results obtained.

RESULTS:
29 clinical reports were identified in the search. The systematic analysis reduced the focus of review to 15 studies. The data available establishes ceramic intracoronal restorations machined by the CEREC System as a clinically successful restorative method with a mean survival rate of 97.4% over a period of 4.2 years. The review also highlights the reasons and the rates of failure for this type of restoration. The predominant reasons for failures are fracture of the ceramic, fracture of the supporting tooth, postoperative hypersensitivity and wear of the interface lute. SIGNIFICANCE: Machinable ceramics, as used by the CEREC System, provide a useful restoration with a high success rate. These restorations are color-stable and wear at a clinically acceptable rate. Wear of the luting composite on occlusal surfaces leads to the phenomenon of submargination. Ceramic fracture, wear at the interface and post-operative hypersensitivity remain a problem which requires further investigation